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This ain't Kansas, Dorothy...

Discussion in 'Education & Training' started by paden cash, Oct 1, 2012.

  1. paden cash

    paden cash 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    4,235
    Location:
    The Great State of Oklahoma
    Licensed in:
    OK
    actually it's Oklahoma.

    Here are four names from our Board of Licensure's newsletter of people who have passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (congrats to all, of course):

    Olukoya, Ifeoluwadayo Adebambo

    Ramaiah, Veera Malayappan Pillai

    Rubin, Robert Ulysses Alexander

    Thribhuvan, Jagdeep Podichetty

    I wanna see how teeny-tiny the letters are when these folks finally get their seals! o.O
     
  2. Holy Cow

    Holy Cow 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    8,639
    My all time favorite was an engineer who did live in Kansas. His name: Saw Kok Pee.
     
  3. Paul in PA

    Paul in PA 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    4,306
    That Is So They Can Outsource More Work To India

    Each of them will be in responsible charge of about a thousand junior engineers.

    The test is that they can "read and write the English language" not actually speak it.

    Just theorizing.

    Paul in PA
     
  4. James Vianna

    James Vianna 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    170
    Location:
    Upstate NY
  5. James Vianna

    James Vianna 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    170
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    and a follow up from the state board found here
    http://www.op.nysed.gov/

    Advisory Notices:
    U.S. Court of Appeals Decision on Litigation Involving 13 Professions that Require U.S. Citizenship or Permanent Lawful Residence for Licensure: Please be advised that in accordance with the decision of the United States Court of Appeals, Second Circuit, in Dandamudi v Tisch, No. 10-4397- CV, 2012 WL 2763281 (July 10, 2012), we will consider applications for licenses from individuals who would otherwise be barred from licensure by statutory requirements of citizenship or permanent residency, in one the following professions:
    •Certified Shorthand Reporting
    •Chiropractic
    •Dentistry
    •Dental Hygiene
    •Landscape Architecture
    •Land Surveying
    •Massage Therapy
    •Medicine
    •Midwifery
    •Pharmacy
    •Professional Engineering
    •Veterinary Medicine
    •Veterinary Technology
    If you believe you meet these requirements, please submit an application for licensure to the Department and we will process your application accordingly. However, please be advised that the period for seeking further review from the U.S. Supreme Court has not lapsed.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  6. sicilian cowboy

    sicilian cowboy 4-Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Messages:
    1,539
    Location:
    Forest Hills, New York
    > The test is that they can "read and write the English language" not actually speak it.


    > Not sure if it is America either, Use to be in NY you had to be a US citizen to obtain licensure, well not anymore.



    Both of these statements take a lot for granted.


    First off (as someone who sort of has one), an unusual name is not an indicator of how well one can speak and/or read English.


    Nor is it an reliable indicator of the citizenship status of a person.


    I've worked with dozens of people over the years with similar names who had been naturalized long ago. I've also worked with people with similar names who were educated in London, and spoke "the King's English" as well as any native.
     
  7. James Fleming

    James Fleming 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    2,962
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Licensed in:
    MD
    > I've also worked with people with similar names who were educated in London, and spoke "the King's English" as well as any native.

    With a name like Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, how can you expect this guy to read, write, and speak the King's English ;-)
     
  8. Stephen Johnson

    Stephen Johnson 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,124
    Location:
    OKC, OK
    Licensed in:
    AZ, CA, KS, NM, OK, TX
    Probably does more properly than we do, even if he has an accent.B-)
     
  9. Farsites

    Farsites 4-Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Messages:
    282
    Location:
    VA, seldom Toronto
    This ain't Porbandar or Lhasa, Dorothy...

    Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

    Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso (Dalai Lama)

    Names.... ha!
     
  10. sicilian cowboy

    sicilian cowboy 4-Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Messages:
    1,539
    Location:
    Forest Hills, New York
    > With a name like Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, how can you expect this guy to read, write, and speak the King's English ;-)


    It took me a half second.......:-P


    (Let's not get into his opinions on female writers......:-O :-O :-O )
     
  11. Robert Hill

    Robert Hill 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2,614
    Location:
    St. Tammany Parish, LA
    Licensed in:
    LA
    or Islamic
     
  12. Andy Nold

    Andy Nold 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,243
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Tx.
    I have seen a couple of instances where immigrant professionals have taken their profession for a new last name. There is a doctor in Midland named Dolly Doctor and there are two guys on the Texas Engineering Board Roster named on the Dinesh Engineer and Hosang Engineer. No Mr. Surveyors in Texas that I am aware of yet.
     
  13. sicilian cowboy

    sicilian cowboy 4-Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Messages:
    1,539
    Location:
    Forest Hills, New York
    I once had to meet an engineer in the field. They told me to look for "Jim Wilson".


    I walked into the field office where there was a south Asian guy with a beard and a turban, and told him I was looking for Jim Wilson.


    In an accent I can't give justice to here (I wish I had a recording of it), he said


    "I AM Jeeemm Weeelson!"


    Turned out he had taken on Jim Wilson as a middle name, and used it professionally.
     
  14. Andy Nold

    Andy Nold 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,243
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Tx.
    On the flipside, I go by Andulu in Mandarin Chinese. Not my choice, that's how it translates.
     
  15. Mark Chain

    Mark Chain 3-Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2012
    Messages:
    529
    > I have seen a couple of instances where immigrant professionals have taken their profession for a new last name.

    Wouldn't be the first time. Below are some names that came from occupations I found on the internets....

    Archer - millitary man who fought with bow and arrow, Armour - made arms and armour, Baker
    Barber
    Barker - tanned hides with bark
    Bellows - bellows maker, or one who operated the huge bellows in the forge
    Boardman - cut timber into boards
    Bowman
    Brewer
    Brewster - female brewer
    Carpenter
    Carter - transported merchandise in a cart
    Cartwright - made carts
    Carver
    Chandler - candle maker (also, ship's chandler, who purveyed ship's supplies
    Clark - clerk
    Cooper
    Crocker - made pottery crocks
    Currier - dressed leather after tanning
    Cutler - made knives and scissors
    Draper - drapery maker
    Falconer - raised and trained falcons (a very significant occupation in Medieval times)
    Farmer
    Fisher - fisherman
    Forrester - lumberman
    Fowler - trapped small birds
    Fuller
    Gardner (Gardiner) - cultivated vegetable and flower garden
    Glazier - glass worker
    Glover - glovemaker
    Goldsmith
    Hooper - the hoop maker for barrels.
    Horner - hornsmith (made cups, ladles & spoons, etc. of horn)
    Keeler - barge tender
    Loomis - loom maker
    Mason - stone cutter or worker
    Miller (Mueller, Moeller, Muller) - one who ran the grain mill.
    Minor
    Naylor - nailmaker
    Packman - peddler
    Painter
    Pearlman - dealer in pearls
    Pittman (Pitman) worked down in the pit with the pitsaw
    Plummer
    Potter
    Roper - ropemaker
    Saddler
    Sailor
    Sandler - sandalmaker
    Sawyer
    Seaman - worked on a ship
    Shearer - sheared wool from sheep
    Shepherd
    Shoemaker
    Skinner
    Slater -
    Smith (Schmidt, Schmitt, Schmid, Smythe) - blacksmith
    Stoner - mason
    Tanner
    Taylor
    Thatcher
    Turner
    Tyler - made and sold tiles
    Wagner (Wagoner) - made or drove wagons
    Wainwright - made wagons
    Waterman - boat operator, ferryman
    Weaver
    Webster - female weaver
    Wheeler - made wheels or spinning wheels
    Wheelwright
    Woodward - forest warden
    FROM THE CHURCH:
    Abbott
    Alderman
    Bishop
    Cannon
    Chaplin
    Parson
    Sexton
     
  16. Dave Lindell

    Dave Lindell 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    Pasadena,CA
    Licensed in:
    CA
    Our local Chinese hand laundry was run by a guy named Ollie Olsen.

    Seems that he was in line for immigration behind a guy named Ollie Olsen, and when they asked him his name he said, "Sam Ting". So they wrote down Ollie Olsen.
     

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