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Rover83
Posts: 819
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(@rover83)
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Posted by: @holy-cow

I was chatting with an attorney this morning who was complaining about not being able to find young lawyers to join his well-established firm.

That's interesting. I was looking hard at going to law school about ~5 years ago. Back then, and even as recently as 2019 the media (and plenty of respectable legal blogs) were talking about "too many law school graduates" and "the market is flooded with lawyers". The general consensus was: don't go to law school unless you are going to be a top tier graduate at a top tier school with some top tier connections, because otherwise there's a decent chance you'll wind up pushing paper at a mediocre job that might not even be a law firm, for far too little money to pay off your JD. It painted a pretty dire picture for potential law school students.

 

Posted by: @holy-cow

The one I was meeting with has more money than he can ever spend and is willing to take time to train young ones.

Would be nice to see some surveyors with both those attributes. Or at the very least, firms willing to implement mentorship programs and dedicate time for it.

Rather than that, my firm has been discussing recording video interviews with senior staff, stuff like "The Lost Art of Surveying" - as if it's a mythical language on the brink of extinction rather than a combination of education, skills and experience that simply needs to be carefully transferred through face-to-face, dedicated contact between generations.

It's basically "how can we spend the least amount of money possible to pretend like we're doing a good thing for the profession?"

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Jitterboogie
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Joined: 3 years ago

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Posts: 2167

@rover83 

How about a YouTube channel, lock comments, and please share all you can, good bad,ugly,and funny.

We the newer up and coming are being screwed by crusty old codger boards and lack of transfer of the best of the old integrated into the new technology etc.

Please do this. I'll help anyway I can.

Please.

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thebionicman
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@jitterboogie 

Most Boards I am familiar with are seasoned professionals giving it their all (for 75 or 100 bucks a DAY). They are generally backed up by underpaid staff working 2 or 3 positions above classification. Salaried staff averages over 60 hours a week for pay 30% under market.

In the current environment most Boards are being stripped of authority and budget. Some are already advisory only and others are heading that way.

So I'd be interested to know how those crusty old codger Boards are screwing the up and coming. Our Board members spend days preparing for meetings witb zero compensation, most of it finding valid pathways for applicants.

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Rover83
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@thebionicman 

Agreed. It's not the Boards - I did not mean to imply it in my post above. I'm much more concerned about firms with top-heavy management structures, where there may be a wealth of practical knowledge going to waste because, as always, it's all about the $$$.

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Jitterboogie
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@thebionicman 

Duly noted. I'm not lambasting the people whom do give a legitimate and valuable effort and actually care about the process and give back.

I'm talking from my direct experience l have with members of the board in my state, which has a declining population of LS, and when discussion with a LS who is a professor and mentor mentions things like ...' well the board is blah blah blah and they have the final word...' : It's not the same everywhere, but from where I am , I see better opportunities in other states, and will move on to avoid being misdirected and completely ignored when I ask direct questions regarding my process to achieve the goal. They arent encouraging, they are just not caring. This is my experience, so mileage might vary. But I don't think so. I'm finding more corroboration in the evidence I'm seeing and receiving.

Hijack over, thank you board members that actually demonstrate the positive and supportive part of the process of insurance that the profession survives.

 

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mkennedy
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Joined: 9 years ago

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@rover83 I wonder if pivoting his recruiting to slightly older lawyers who have managed to pay off all or some portion of their loans might work? That is, look for lawyers who want a better work/life balance in a place with cheaper cost-of-living, better schools (maybe), etc.

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holy cow
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@mkennedy 

That is a great idea.  I will mention that to him.

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BStrand
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Can't even live on 36K a year unless you're a single person with a relatively modest lifestyle.

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Rover83
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Joined: 6 years ago

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Posted by: @bstrand

Can't even live on 36K a year unless you're a single person with a monkish lifestyle and no medical issues, no other family members to assist/support, no debt to service, one or two hobbies, no major home or vehicle maintenance issues to take care of (better have some public transportation nearby), and full medical benefits.

That last thing will cost you and your employer anywhere from 10-30K per year, before you start shelling out for copays, and anywhere from 10-25% of that will come out of that 36K that is your "pay".

Fixed it for ya. 😉 And I say that as someone who was in that exact situation - and it was ten years ago.

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