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What really is the role of a survey technician....

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Jitterboogie
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At the LSIT level and in the transition to LSIT?

Is it reasonable to think that someone with that kind of experience anywhere from 4 to 10 years should be drafting drainage plans curb and gutter and other types of MEP or is that way over scope and that's beyond survey just curious.

I understand that drafting is part of the process and I'm getting better at it daily but sometimes I wonder because my sub-assemblies for Ada walks and curbs and gutter and impoundments and and and...

I begin to wonder where we cross over to the civil engineering side and you're kind of taking advantage of someone and a set of skills that's not really what they do but I guess I don't know and I'm asking because I'm looking at jobs and some small to medium-sized design build businesses and it seems like drafting is heavily relied upon and I'm not sure what that means.

And yes I understand when I'm doing cut and fill for a curb and gutter and setting up the plans for the field work to set the markers and set the elevations I'm supposed to be able to know how to read the plans and take it but I guess my question is how many of you utilize the survey techs to do that drawing and that utilization rather than the civil engineering group and or do you just share the responsibility.

And wow Google text to voice or voice to text is doing a pretty good job today.

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RADAR
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As long as an engineer is stamping the plans, it's not a big deal.

An LSIT is probably paid less than an EIT; even if the LSIT can do a better job. So of course they're going for spending the least amount of money and making the most...

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holy cow
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@dougie 

The fellow who owned my house property before me was a bachelor.  He was very much a back to nature sort of a guy.  He helped me survey for a couple of years and loved inspecting the various flora and fauna we encountered.  Also, any rock houses, fences or buildings.  He had a well drilled and a windmill installed.  His goal was to have the windmill pump water up to a concrete storage tank.  A picher pump was to be installed near a sink.  That would be the entire water system for the house.  No need for an indoor bathroom.  He could use a galvanized washing tub when he needed a bath.  About 100 feet from the house he dug a deep hole in the yard, stacked square bales of straw up to form screening and placed roofing tin across the top of the bales with enough concrete blocks set on them to keep them from flying away.  He placed a chair, somewhat similar to the one shown, only a much earlier version, to straddle the hole.

 

shopping
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Jitterboogie
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@holy-cow 

They could have at least matched the seat color better..... 🤨 

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Warren Smith
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When I was an LSIT in the 1970s, I drafted a lot of plan and profile drawings in addition to the final maps.  It is useful skill when doing construction layout.

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One cup o joe
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@warren-smith ALONG WITH MILES AND MILES OF CROSS SECTIONS!

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Warren Smith
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@one-cup-o-joe And stadia topos ...

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Hi-staker
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Survey techs who want to continue to advance their career should be willing to do a multitude of tasks.

I tell my techs that they are my eyes, ears, and nose in the field. I am trusting them with my license. It is their job to give me all the details of what they find or see in the field, even when I'm standing right next to them on the same job site.

When field work is not available, then they should be willing to jump in on drafting, technical writing, filing, research, or any other task that needs to be taken care of to keep the gears turning. Any and all of those tasks, no matter how complicated or menial, will help them grow and learn in their career.

I know that when I was in the process of transitioning from a point monkey to an actual survey tech/LSI, drafting of any type helped me learn tons of what goes on behind the scenes. The ability to put into drawing boundaries, plans, or whatever needs drafting is a lifelong skill. Having someone bleed (redline) all over your product and then able to make corrections without getting insulted is also a huge skill set.

Look at every task as a chance to learn. Only you can decide what to take away from those tasks.

 

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Jitterboogie
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@hi-staker 

Yeah, I'm picking up what you're laying down. The Surveyor I was working with was doing just that.

Encouraging and not demeaning, firm but not unfair or ridiculous.

I like pounding grid once in a while. Just not 15 hours a day anymore.

Which is why I'm being very judicious with the application and interview process.

Dirt and sweat is part of Surveying. Teaching the new people how to pound rebar and mag nails and offsets and field calcs is too.

I'm in a rare place, about 50/50 shifty for field and office.

I'd be happy and willing with similar and fill in doing anything as needed when we have all hands stuff.  That's just good teaming.

Thank you for your answers.

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thebionicman
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You are mixing employment conditions and job titles. The two may or may not enjoy a relationship, unless of course you are in a union shop.

You do what needs done under the direction of the licensee. If you are not comfortable speak up...

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Jitterboogie
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@thebionicman 

Understood. It's they lay of the land with lots of the job descriptions and HR department BS.

We want. PLS. But we'll take someone who knows something and wants to get a license some day.

That's not the most horrible one.

 

 

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