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Kmw
 Kmw
(@kmw)
Posts: 9
Regular Member Member
Topic starter
 

We just purchased a used NetR9. 

I manage to get everything set up and we've been changing the settings of the NETR9 by logging in using the DHCP IP address.

I've watched the Duncan-Parnell NETR9 youtube video about a zillion times

We logged 5, 24 hr sessions and processed using OPUS. So we have our base location nailed down.

I'm just not having any luck actually connecting to the base with my Rover. Seems we are missing a step.

We created a user name and password for NTRIP Caster 1  port 2101

Do I have to have a static IP address?  I figure I would just set it up here at home temporarily, then once I knew what I was doing, we'd move it to a more suitable location.

Am I correct in assuming all we need is the NETR9 and its built in features, no need for additional ntrip software or online caster etc. ??

Thank you in advance for any help. 

 

 

 
Posted : January 11, 2023 11:51 am
OleManRiver
(@olemanriver)
Posts: 983
Member Member
 

You will or at least you use to need a static ip. But if you look and try logging in off the dynamic ip first to see if it is even sending corrections. I have done this with with cell to cell on 5700 years ago. I am trying to remember on the net series which was net rs we used a gps base software for testing. You will have to make it broadcast via the ip and port. I cannot for the life of me remember the technical term but you can create a name that follows the dynamic IP address as it changes every time it hits the internet. That is a little better security wise.  Are you permanently mounting this or mobile like base and rover.  I imagine your local dealer would be able to help you. I wish I could remember all the interface and such. I have not used a netr9 so i am going off net rs and such. When you go to settings via the ip set up does it still have the different menus for making it cmr cmrx rtcm and all the latency types for automatic broadcast etc. if you monitor the ip and have someone log in with rover to that ip and port. There use to be a free software you can log in to see if it is streaming or not as well. Can’t think of it either. Getting old stinks. I use to use it for testing. Maybe it will pop in my head. Good luck. Someone here hopefully will be more familiar and get the blanks filled in. 

 
Posted : January 11, 2023 8:01 pm
Jitterboogie reacted
antcrook
(@antcrook)
Posts: 246
Member Member
 

You need to forward port 2101 by accessing your router/modem settings. Right now it is sitting behind your firewall and is not accessible from the outside.

To check your IP address simply type "what is my ip" from any browser. Most ISP's will keep the IP static for a while, except in the case of using a cellular modem. 

 
Posted : January 11, 2023 8:32 pm
Jitterboogie reacted

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John Hamilton
(@john-hamilton)
Posts: 3216
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There are several ways to do this. If it is at a fixed location, you can get to it even if it has a dynamic IP address. The Net R9 should have a static IP on the internal network, something like 192.168.1.71, etc. I use noip.com to continuously update the ever changing outside IP. I have found that verizon Fios does change the IP but not frequently. Then you need to open port 2101 in your router to forward port 2101 data through to the static internal IP. 

If it is at a mobile location (i.e. over cell), that complicates things. I do have both an AT&T and a Verizon sim with static IP, that makes it easy. If you don't have static IP, for example a mifi hotspot, then you can use a program called SNIP on an office PC to run an NTrip caster there. I did a recent project where I had one receiver (Alloy) as a base using a Microhard modem with static IP, and a R750 as a base using a google fi sim (dynamic). The problem with the dynamic sims is that the cell providers somehow block incoming connections, I have not been able to find a way around that. So the R750 would send data continuously to SNIP. Similar to above, you need to configure the incoming data stream to pass through the router/firewall and go to SNIP (which has a static internal IP). Another nice feature of SNIP is that if I send data from both receivers in (or more than 2), you can use the NEAREST feature to automatically connect to the nearest base receiver. I have gotten this to work with Trimble R10: R10 internal wifi-->mifi-->SNIP 

I much prefer using a static IP at a remote base, that way I can also connect to the webUI from anywhere to configure, start/stop, check battery, download, etc. I was able to get a Verizon SIM with static IP for $20/month through dataactivationservices, but the AT&T static SIM is only available from AT&T and costs about $50/month. The google fi data SIM is $10/gb with no monthly fee when on an existing google FI voice account (which is $20/month plus $10/gb). I use a google fi voice sim as a second phone when traveling, it uses the T-Mobile network.  

 

There are several ways to test the setup.

1) test on the internal network. Connect the data collector to the network using wifi, and try to connect to the NTrip caster. No port forwarding is needed

2) use an app called Ntrip Client from Lefebure (android, not sure if there is an iPhone app). This can be used internally and externally without a GPS receiver to check the connectivity.   

This post was modified 3 weeks ago 2 times by John Hamilton
 
Posted : January 12, 2023 5:01 am
John Hamilton
(@john-hamilton)
Posts: 3216
Member Member
 

There are several ways to do this. If it is at a fixed location, you can get to it even if it has a dynamic IP address. The Net R9 should have a static IP on the internal network, something like 192.168.1.71, etc. I use noip.com to continuously update the ever changing outside IP. I have found that verizon Fios does change the IP but not frequently. Then you need to open port 2101 in your router to forward port 2101 data through to the static internal IP. 

If it is at a mobile location (i.e. over cell), that complicates things. I do have both an AT&T and a Verizon sim with static IP, that makes it easy. If you don't have static IP, for example a mifi hotspot, then you can use a program called SNIP on an office PC to run an NTrip caster there. I did a recent project where I had one receiver (Alloy) as a base using a Microhard modem with static IP, and a R750 as a base using a google fi sim (dynamic). The problem with the dynamic sims is that the cell providers somehow block incoming connections, I have not been able to find a way around that. So the R750 would send data continuously to SNIP. Similar to above, you need to configure the incoming data stream to pass through the router/firewall and go to SNIP (which has a static internal IP). Another nice feature of SNIP is that if I send data from both receivers in (or more than 2), you can use the NEAREST feature to automatically connect to the nearest base receiver. I have gotten this to work with Trimble R10: R10 internal wifi-->mifi-->SNIP. I had to figure that out after AT&T sunset 3G last year. Before that, we used an R10 as a cell base all the time with a static IP onboard.  

I much prefer using a static IP at a remote base, that way I can also connect to the webUI from anywhere to configure, start/stop, check battery, download, etc. I was able to get a Verizon SIM with static IP for $20/month through dataactivationservices, but the AT&T static SIM is only available from AT&T and costs about $50/month. The google fi data SIM is $10/gb with no monthly fee when on an existing google FI voice account (which is $20/month plus $10/gb). I use a google fi voice sim as a second phone when traveling, it uses the T-Mobile network.  

 

There are several ways to test the setup.

1) test on the internal network. Connect the data collector to the network using wifi, and try to connect to the NTrip caster. No port forwarding is needed

2) use an app called Ntrip Client from Lefebure (android, not sure if there is an iPhone app). This can be used internally and externally without a GPS receiver to check the connectivity.   

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 5:11 am
MI-Other-Left
(@michigan-left)
Posts: 255
Member Member
 

Posted by: @kmw

We created a user name and password for NTRIP Caster 1  port 2101

Had a similar issue like you're having.

There are two places where you need to set up the username/password credentials.

1) in the "caster" page, and 2) in the "receiver" page.

The caster allows access to the stream, but you aslo need to set up the username/password/permissions for an external user to log in to the receiver first, which then allows the user to move on to the caster stream credential check.

You have to set up an "NTRIP user account on the receiver" with username, password, and permissions to log into the base receiver in order to access the NTRIP stream. (the initial web browser login type)

I had best results when the new "receiver" username/password credentials matched the "caster" credentials. I made them both very simple, but also disabled all permissions on the new receiver user except "NTRIP".

I fought with this for days before I found a video where they were flying rtk drones from a base receiver, and they made it clear that this had to be done.

And also all the port forwarding tcp/ip stuff...

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 5:33 am

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Kmw
 Kmw
(@kmw)
Posts: 9
Regular Member Member
Topic starter
 

Good morning everyone-

Last night around 10:30pm while in some sort of Ntrip brain fog -  I did access my router and went to advanced settings

It lists all the things in my entire house that are connected and shows their "internal" IP address - they are all 192.168.68.... etc.   I see the NetR9 listed 192.168.68... So I selected the Net9R and entered port 2101 to be forwarded to external port 2101.

Seems Correct?

When I'm on my PC and type "whats my IP"   it says my public IP is 67.81.70.... 

Do I need to do anything with that? 

Just to clarify the NETR9 is hardwired into my router and is permanently mounted for now. 

I also used telnet to open and close some ports on the NetR9. 

I tried NTRIP Caster 1 port 2101 The port did light up green in the trimble config screen, telnet says connecting .....but it did not stream any symbols etc. on my PC screen. It then says connection to host lost and then the trimble config screen goes red for port 2101

I enabled tcp/ip port 5018 and used telnet to open that port. Port turned green,  it was streaming a bunch of symbols on my pc screen.  that seems to work 

So thats my current progress. I will mess around some more later today. I'll try testing with the data collector connected to wifi.  maybe at lunch time or this evening.  I feel like we are very close to getting it to work.  

 

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 5:42 am
John Hamilton
(@john-hamilton)
Posts: 3216
Member Member
 

@kmw

Set the Net R9 to use a static internal IP. On my network I have 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.99 as static IP's, DHCP assigns addresses above 192.168.1.100. That is a setting in the router to assign above .100.

Here is what the port forwarding entry on the fios router looks like to forward incoming 2101 data to the PC running SNIP (named HASSLER)

of course different routers would appear slightly different, but that works on mine

So instead of .98, you would put in the static internal IP for the R9

 

Also, if coming from outside your network, you could use that IP but if it changes it won't work. I think you need to specifically request (and pay for) a static public IP. I use noip.com to keep track of my public IP.  There is a free service for 1 hostname. Actually, I use the plus managed DNS so that I can have multiple hostnames for my modem receivers, etc. https://www.noip.com/remote-access

 

 

 

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by John Hamilton
 
Posted : January 12, 2023 6:09 am
MI-Other-Left
(@michigan-left)
Posts: 255
Member Member
 

The "67." ip address is your public facing ip address to the internet from your ISP.

That is the ip address you need to type into the NTRIP caster to hit whatever "local network" your receiver is operating behind.

The port forwarding should be enabled through your modem and/or router.

The settings will be different while working "inside" your local network (testing), vs accessing your local network from the outside.

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 6:13 am

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Kmw
 Kmw
(@kmw)
Posts: 9
Regular Member Member
Topic starter
 

John- it looks like my router has "address reservation"  that sounds like Static to me.  lol 

The NetR9 address is reserved. 

 

Just a quick update - then I really need to get a ton of drafting done.

I set my Leica CS20 to connect to my wifi and then was able to connect to port 2101 and receive corrections.  so that's good.!!!

I got greedy and then tried to connect using the cellular modem in the rover - that did not work. 

I will re-read everyone's replies and do my best to digest everything. Then have another go at it this afternoon. 

👍

 

 

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 6:33 am
John Hamilton
(@john-hamilton)
Posts: 3216
Member Member
 

@kmw cellular modem in the rover...should be the easiest to deal with. BUT, the rover needs to know the CURRENT address at the server. If it is static, no problem. If not, you need to use a DNS service and assign a name like Ntrip.mycompany.com

 

When I first tried to do this years ago, I struggled for a while. Now I pretty much have it figured out and we use RTK over cell almost exclusively, rarely use radio. 

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by John Hamilton
 
Posted : January 12, 2023 6:51 am
Kmw
 Kmw
(@kmw)
Posts: 9
Regular Member Member
Topic starter
 

We have terrible cell service here.  We use a combo of Tmobile and Verizon 

lots of times we will just burn in one point, then set up the Leica GS16 base and go UHF connection to the Leica GS18.  The NY State network and Connecticut bases are 25-30miles away most of the time for us.  The local pay station only offers two constellations and is 12 miles away.

So, by doing our own base we have 4 constellations and usually 5-7 miles from our base at most and we own it! 

It'll be really nice once its all sorted out. 

 

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 8:41 am

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Kmw
 Kmw
(@kmw)
Posts: 9
Regular Member Member
Topic starter
 

Bingo - its working.  I read all the replies and once I wrapped my mind around internal and external IP and how the data flow it was clear to me how the settings had to be. 

Testing locally using my network wifi on the internal IP address was throwing me off - Once I set the collector back to cellular internet and set to look for the public IP it connected right up. 

 

 

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 11:32 am
OleManRiver reacted
Kmw
 Kmw
(@kmw)
Posts: 9
Regular Member Member
Topic starter
 

Posted by: @michigan-left

The "67." ip address is your public facing ip address to the internet from your ISP.

That is the ip address you need to type into the NTRIP caster to hit whatever "local network" your receiver is operating behind.

The port forwarding should be enabled through your modem and/or router.

The settings will be different while working "inside" your local network (testing), vs accessing your local network from the outside.

That was what turned on the light bulb.  I was so set on the internal IP and thats how I had configured and tested everything, so in my mind that was the IP i needed to connect too.  

Man o man.  It would be so easy to set up another one now.  👍 

 

 

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 4:57 pm
jim.cox and OleManRiver reacted
MI-Other-Left
(@michigan-left)
Posts: 255
Member Member
 

TCP/IP and networking can be a real PITA if you're not an IT person, but once you understand, it sticks with you. I think of it like plumbing. There's inside the house, and outside the house. It's all connected, but you have to think about flow. How do you get from the internet through the one pipe address pointing into your house (local network) that has your receiver and NTRIP caster on it?

Nice work!

 
Posted : January 12, 2023 7:10 pm

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