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holy cow
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Had a call for a survey last evening where I started to brag.  Shouldn't do that I suppose, but it both comforts the client and gives them the impression they may get a discount on the cost.

"Yes, i know right where you are talking about.  Jean Allen (an old bachelor) lived there for years in that rock house.  I should have good control anywhere in your section as I surveyed directly across the road in 2001 for Bob Smith.  We just broke down the southeast quarter of your section earlier this Summer and found the center corner.  Surveyed directly across the railroad tracks on your east side for Curly Johnson about 2005.  Found the southwest corner bar about seven years ago when working on the job for your brother, Tom, in the section to the south to help me find the south line of the Showalter place when he and Dennis were needing to agree on replacing that half mile of fence."

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am95405
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I comment on native tree species when hiking with my family. I know quite a few in California where I live. We were on vacation in Wyoming this summer and my teenage son said, it's great hiking here as mom doesn't know the trees and can't point them out.

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Williwaw
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My first day at my first real surveying job,  the LS had me pace out 50' next to a rag tape. Nineteen steps on flat ground. Guess the first thing I do with the new guy on his first day.

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Richard Imrie
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@williwaw 

That reminds me, I need to calibrate my pace.

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BStrand
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@williwaw

That was one of the very first things they had us do in school also.  That and laying out a grid with only a tape (still haven't done in the real world).

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Williwaw
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@bstrand Way back, one of my first Party Chief jobs, got tasked with topo on 20 acres for a housing development and the site was completely covered in the densest spruce forest I'd ever seen, couldn't see 20' into it and we didn't have GPS and using the gun was out. I didn't know what to do. Rob, the LS I was working under, what a great teacher he was, told me they only needed to be accurate with the topo to within a foot. After we had run a traverse around the site and leveled through our traverse points, had me use a compass and rag tape to run 50' transects in a grid pattern through the site cutting just enough to see ahead and had me carry elevations with a P-gun every 50'.  When we popped out the other side I could check one of our trav points to see how far off I was. Got to say it was crude but got the job done. There's a forty unit housing complex on the site now, but every time I pass it all I see is that impenetrable spruce thicket.

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BStrand
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@williwaw

Nice, what is a p-gun though?

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Williwaw
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@bstrand It's a small hand level. Small tube with an internal spirit bubble you can look through at a level rod and adjust to read the rod when you get the bubble to indicate level. Grade hops would use them a lot before GPS became the thing. Plus up to eye level and subtract the rod reading to get to your new elevation, move ahead, rinse and repeat.

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BStrand
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@williwaw

Ahh, OK I've only heard them called hand levels.  I bet it would work slick for a task like that.

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John Putnam
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@bstrand 

Now I feel old.

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BStrand
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@john-putnam

Ha!

Well, I did use them a little in school but only to avoid going to far uphill on level loops.

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Norman Oklahoma
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@bstrand 

i think that the term derives from “ pea shooter”, which they resemble.

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Edward Reading
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@norman-oklahoma I always heard that it was from using them to run the "p-line" or preliminary line for road alignments.

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jflamm
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@williwaw My first crew chief had me measure my boot so I could use it to judge distance in or out while on the rod and doing stakeout.  We did throw down the 100' tape and calibrate our pacing as well.  Good times!

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FairbanksLS
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I learned to only count the left foot when pacing. At one time I'd usually be within .5 feet, often less when staking CL.  Only used a hand level when running slopes.  An abbey hand level or a clinometer was more useful for surveying.

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Bill93
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Posted by: @fairbanksls 
abbey hand level

Abney.

I have not learned accurate pacing. I count ... and 5 and 10 and ...  but that is with an unnatural stride and I usually end up a little further than intended. But 3 ft steps are too much of a stretch and I prefer not to have to calculate for some odd length step.

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FairbanksLS
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@bill93 

Yep, the b is next to the n.  Knowing that would you conclude it is my inability to spell or my fat fingers that caused the mistake?

Using your normal gate gets better results when pacing.

Haha!

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holy cow
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Many years ago I discovered that if were to focus on the pacing and make my step just a bit more than my normal stride (feel it in the muscles a tad) I would hit three feet for each step/six feet for a full pace.  I know put a little more effort into it to make each step to stay at three feet.  The bigger challenge comes when going uphill and downhill crossing gentle ditches.  If going both up and down it sort of averages out.

Wading through tall grass or nearly ripe crops such as wheat and oats is much tougher and somewhat depending on if you are going with the grain (pun) or across it. Following the gaps between each planted row of grain is going with the grain BTW.

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