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FEMA Elevation Certificate - Adding Photos/Notes/ETC

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ASM
 ASM
(@asm)
Posts: 2
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I saw a comment in a recent post in this forum about printing photos, cutting them out and taping them to the EC. I admit, I used to do that and it was extremely time consuming. I realize and understand from that same post that the author stated that technology is crippling us by taking away our simple solutions mindset. I somewhat agree. However, in staying with the Topic Title of my post and possibly offering another solution to Elevation Certificate form problems, I share this. I was told by my NFIP State Director that handwriting on the EC would invalidate it....and I have been doing that for years. So, frustrated and angry that I might have to buy new software or invest in Adobe to be able to edit the EC form to insert photos and make comments, I remembered that I had already invested in fantastic software, Carlson Survey!!!! I created a dwg just for my EC by attaching the first 8 pages of the pdf in paperspace, one page per layout and VIOLA!!! an editable form where I can type all my comments, data, and insert photos then print them out with a professional quality. If I had more photos to add to the form, I just copied page 8 titled 'BUILDING PHOTOGRAPHS Continuation Page'. Carlson Survey also allowed me to add my FIS Profile Page and digitally show how I determined the BFE. I also was able to add any other documentation needed to support my EC i.e. engineered flood vent data sheets, just as long as they were in pdf format, I could attach them to a new layout. Once finished, I published all the layouts to a PDF. Hope this helps any one out there struggling with the same issue I had with FEMA EC forms.

 

And to support the author of Technology is Crippling Us:

I am fortunate to have my son work with me in his pursuit of a survey license. In one of my teaching moments to him recently, we was fore warning me of a project where the deeds were old and lacking lots of good information, but still gave enough to be able to successfully survey the property. I gave him a little insight, having come from the plumb-bob and chain days of experience into today's technology I told him this: "To be a good surveyor you need to be able to put paper on the ground and the ground on paper with as little technology as possible. Then when you have technology, you will be a great surveyor."

 

 
Posted : November 21, 2022 7:25 am
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holy cow
(@holy-cow)
Posts: 23830
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@asm

Excellent training, ASM.

You must walk that ground to do the job correctly.  Following the footsteps and all that jazz.  In PLSSia, one of the most common survey errors made  is by those who circle the section finding the newest reported quarter corners but never going to the TRUE center corner to look for a monument.  They falsely believe that whatever "X" they come up means the center is at that specific coordinate.  That is rarely the case.  By overlooking that detail, they whip through a little CAD work to layout the five acre tract that is allegedly an aliquot part or at least one side of it runs along a quarter section line or some similar aliquot line.  That then blasphemes the existing survey monuments that are golden.

 

 
Posted : November 21, 2022 8:55 pm
ASM reacted