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Sponsored [Sticky] Time To Try A Better Software

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SiteCompSurvey
(@sitecompsurvey)
Posts: 5
Member Vendor
Topic starter
 

Hello!

Are you using AutoCAD / Carlson / MicroSurvey for your calculation or mapping software and unsatisfied? The land surveying & mapping software industry often forgets what the customer truly wants. Companies will build complex tools, adding to a problem instead of fixing one. 

SiteComp software is built for land surveyors & ease of use. The underlying technology is point based, making it both accurate & efficient. It requires much less file space compared to other programs. While other software choices take months to learn, SiteComp takes days. We have been serving both the private and public sectors for over 30 years. 

Unlike most surveying products, SiteComp is not based on a CAD core engine. It is based on a Coordinate Design Information System (CDIS), and engine which was created specifically for design disciplines that require geospatial analysis. In CDIS, because the linework is actually defined by the physical coordinate, and lines are separated by layers (the only similarity to CAD), points can be described by layer, allowing the use of actual point descriptions to manage the points. 

SiteComp users frequently achieve significant time savings. When a user is collecting large amounts of points and data every day, software design has a big effect on time. With other software choices on the market, a user will sift through tools not needed, to locate the ones necessary. 

Lastly, the software is of course compatible with all other design software, both importing and exporting, making any transition needed seamless.

Contact us for a demo today! Our website is sitecomp.net

[email protected] or 612-375-9000 for more info / sales. 

Thank you! 

 
Posted : August 11, 2022 8:59 am
Andy J, RADAR, Andy J and 3 people reacted
Wendell
(@wendell)
Posts: 5407
Founder Admin
 

I'm Wendell, owner/admin of SurveyorConnect.com, and I approve this message. 😎 

Thank you, John, for supporting SurveyorConnect! 😊 🤩 

 
Posted : August 11, 2022 9:13 am
spyropas, OleManRiver, SiteCompSurvey and 10 people reacted
Norman Oklahoma
(@norman-oklahoma)
Posts: 6680
Member Member
 

I haven't had time to fully review the material, but it seems like the approach is akin to that of the old C&G, where you calculated points and then drew lines and curves between them - and if you wanted to move the line you had to recalc the points - as opposed to the CAD approach where you draw the lines and curves and then populate the geometry with points.  

 
Posted : August 11, 2022 11:11 am

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OleManRiver
(@olemanriver)
Posts: 742
Member Member
 

Maybe I don’t really have to learn civil3d after all.  Another software I will be adding to my list of reviewing. I read in some of the documents it was UNIX based at one time. Oh I long for the UNIX days. Windows just makes me grumpy lol. Interesting reading on the site. I will have to see if I can find more out about this for sure. 

 
Posted : August 11, 2022 6:51 pm
Andy J
(@andy-j)
Posts: 3028
Member Member
 

I've always wanted to use this software, but it's tough to swim against the tide of autocad.    I'm curious if there are any land surveyor users that can chime in, or if there is a video online that shows how a land surveyor could actually use this on a daily basis.   

I think I used the DOS based version of this for cogo way back in the early 90's when I started surveying.  

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 5:40 am
hpalmer
(@hpalmer)
Posts: 351
Member Supporter
 

Is this the same software Richard Harrison developed?  If so, I used it in the early/mid 1980's on a Kaypro or Compaq and thought it was intuitive and worked well.

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 1:02 pm

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Andy J
(@andy-j)
Posts: 3028
Member Member
 

@hpalmer  I believe so.   

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 1:09 pm
SiteCompSurvey
(@sitecompsurvey)
Posts: 5
Member Vendor
Topic starter
 

This review is dated, but will offer insight to anyone curious: 

 

https://lidarmag.com/2004/08/31/software-review-sitecomp-survey-2/

This post was modified 4 months ago by SiteCompSurvey
 
Posted : August 12, 2022 1:43 pm
Dave Drahn
(@dave-o)
Posts: 264
Member Member
 
Posted by: @sitecompsurvey

This review is dated, but will offer insight to anyone curious: 

 

https://lidarmag.com/2004/08/31/software-review-sitecomp-survey-2/

'dated' is an understatement for tech software like this.

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 2:14 pm

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SiteCompSurvey
(@sitecompsurvey)
Posts: 5
Member Vendor
Topic starter
 

@dave-o You are correct in many ways, but in other ways, we make software that simply works for land surveyors. Not as many bells & whistles compared to AutoCAD... but have a demo with us & you will see the value. 

This post was modified 4 months ago by SiteCompSurvey
 
Posted : August 12, 2022 2:34 pm
OleManRiver
(@olemanriver)
Posts: 742
Member Member
 

@sitecompsurvey post the system requirements. Do you allow like a demo trial say 30 days or so. Also for a demo of you running the software would it be like a webinar type setting? I am trying to figure out how to see it in action etc.   

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 3:30 pm
hpalmer
(@hpalmer)
Posts: 351
Member Supporter
 

With all the bells and whistles of autocad and micro station it makes it challenging to turn off what you or users do not need.  Lots to be said for points oriented geometry

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 4:16 pm

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SiteCompSurvey
(@sitecompsurvey)
Posts: 5
Member Vendor
Topic starter
 

@olemanriver Sending you a message. 

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 7:24 pm
OleManRiver
(@olemanriver)
Posts: 742
Member Member
 

@sitecompsurvey Roger that. 

 
Posted : August 12, 2022 7:27 pm
RPlumb314
(@rplumb314)
Posts: 369
Member Member
 
Posted by: @olemanriver

Maybe I don’t really have to learn civil3d after all.  Another software I will be adding to my list of reviewing. I read in some of the documents it was UNIX based at one time. Oh I long for the UNIX days. Windows just makes me grumpy lol. Interesting reading on the site. I will have to see if I can find more out about this for sure.

I worked for a company in the Twin Cities, where SiteComp is based, and ran the Unix versions for 8 or 10 years, starting in the mid-1990s. Before that I ran some that were written in Basic. The Basic versions of the program were quite sophisticated but the computers were slow, and a screen refresh took a long time.

The Unix versions were fast and easy to use. In terms of ergonomics, one advantage they had was a good many hot keys, i.e. combinations of keyboard and mouse keys, for commonly used commands. You had to learn those, but that didn't take long since you used them every day.

Once you knew the hot keys, they were much faster than screen buttons and pull-down menus. It has annoyed me ever since to have to move a mouse around and click several times to do something like a pan or zoom. If you can save a few seconds on such an operation, it increases your productivity quite a bit in the course of a day.

It was necessary to occupy an existing point, or set a new one, before doing anything, just as you would in the field. One of the mouse keys would snap to the point nearest the cursor, or you could input the point number. As I recall there was a display bar at the bottom of the screen that listed the occupied point, coordinates, elevation and description.

Hitting the letter T started a traverse routine from the occupied point, with linework created from your bearing/angle and distance input, and new points set as you went along. Shift-T did the same but without creating lines. Points could be displayed as tick marks (point objects), or not, as desired.

Of course we'd normally start with the field points. Those were generated by a separate (TDS) program from the raw data. All the PNEZD data would come with them.

To inverse between two points, my recollection is that you'd occupy them in succession and then hit a single key. Can't remember now what it was. Another single key would draw a line between the two points on whatever layer was active.

We ran the SiteComp on Hewlett-Packard Series 900 workstations, running HP-UX 9 and upward. They're not being made any more, unfortunately.

SiteComp's transition to Windows was under way when I retired. Of course I don't know how the present-day version compares to the ones I ran.

 
Posted : August 21, 2022 8:48 am

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