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Survey Tales

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Nate The Surveyor
(@nate-the-surveyor)
5,000+ posts Member

I'm right there, with A Harris.

When you cannot pee off your front porch, due to traffic, and neighbors, it's time to MOVE to the country.

(Of course, I have daughters, and so this has CHANGED my thinking, and I have to duck back in the woods now a days!)

N

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Topic starter Posted : June 1, 2020 7:20 am
Norman Oklahoma
(@norman-oklahoma)
5,000+ posts Member

@nate-the-surveyor

I actually enjoy the challenge of surveying in the "by the square inch" territory. It's a challenge. And when people have paid $8,000,000 for 50' of street frontage they aren't so tight about the survey fees. I could do without all the traffic and the tacky people who somehow manage to saunter right down my sight lines.   

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Posted : June 1, 2020 9:19 am
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paden cash
(@paden-cash)
10,000+ posts Supporter

@norman-oklahoma

In 1988 or so I worked on a section boundary in an extensive 'urban canyon' not far from here.

 

15 33 edmond

It had a laundry list of every sort of survey debris that could be imagined...highway, RR, multiple corners, platted and non-platted, old and new...all in one of the densest traffic areas in the metro.  It nearly ate our lunch.  The only good thing we had going for us was a new top mounted Nikon EDM.  The survey took almost a year (on and off).  I never got so sick of 'return trips' to satisfy the folks in the office.

I work mainly in rural areas by choice nowadays.  My hat's off to anybody that earns their living in these "urban canyons".

 

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Posted : June 1, 2020 9:32 am
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Nate The Surveyor
(@nate-the-surveyor)
5,000+ posts Member

 

Stress on the crew:

Once upon a time, circa 1971-1974, I lived in California. Dad was a surveyor. We drove a 1957 Ford Panel truck. My brother, me, and Kevin, (my brother's buddy) were the Crew, for the day. I was always the tail chainman, with a nail in the end of the tape, so as to not "Curl and crystalize the end" It was a simple task. Go to a small place SE of Oakhurst, Somewhere near and partway up the north side of Deadwood mountain. The client had bought a tract, about 10 acres.

I remember this client, because he had a small toy steam engine, on the kitchen table. It burned alcohol. Fill the water tank, and the alcohol tank, light the wick, and in about 20 minutes, spin the flywheel, and it would run. 

He was dividing his property, into several pieces, since a road had been built into it. The client was working my dad real hard. "OK, lets put the line here", and we'd run it, and dad would give them an acreage. They would get another idea, to use the road. And, redo it, and then the acreage. By the time they had settled on what they would do, it was a 20 minute meeting, dissolved into 2-3 hrs. Something had happened, and my brother, and kevin were in a fit of laughter. Dad was very un-amused. The stress was in the air. It went on for a while. I was feeling the stress. As I walked, an acorn fell out of a tree, near my feet. I picked it up, and threw it up, in a big arc. It fell near vertical, and landed in Dad's BACK POCKET. This sent Kevin and Brother into fits of laughter. They nearly hurt themselves. Dad was in NO MOOD for this.

On the way home, dad sat in the truck, driving. Suddenly he leaned foreward, reached his right hand back, and extracted the offending bump out of his back pocket. He held the acorn in front of his face. Fits of stifled laughter erupted. It nearly hurt them, to see dad wonder how that had happened.

Fall is in the air. School buses are getting ready. Deer season is right around the corner.

Nate

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Topic starter Posted : September 13, 2021 3:07 pm
Jed
 Jed
(@jed)
50+ posts Member

You guys are speakin my language! I found a bunch of old line posts today and i would imagine who ever set them wasn't working alone but im just a glutton for punishment. Damn Mondays😔

 

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Posted : September 13, 2021 7:33 pm
holy cow
(@holy-cow)
20,000+ posts Member

Here's a true survey tale that happened today.  Found all four corners of out lot project that were 1" iron pipes set in 1952 and consistently about eight inches below today's ground level.  The measurements were nearly perfect with record.  BTW, that 1952 subdivision was designed and surveyed by a PE.  Wasn't much of anyone else allowed to survey here in 1952.

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Posted : September 13, 2021 9:09 pm

paden cash
(@paden-cash)
10,000+ posts Supporter

@holy-cow 

I worked on platting an area in 1968 when I was a lowly chainman.  I remember the engineer set a quarter corner at 2640' because, well that's what engineers did back then before there were licensed surveyors in OK.  Chaining with him was a pain.  I'd go home at night with cramps on the inside of my forearm.

Anyway, fast forward to last week and I had to dig up both ends of that line.  Measured distance = 2640.02'.  

I smiled a little.

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Posted : September 14, 2021 4:29 am
holy cow
(@holy-cow)
20,000+ posts Member

This is a follow up on a previous post.  The dates provided indicate when licensure was officially launched for each profession.  This suggests there were many trained and experienced individuals who could follow the lead of their unlicensed mentors who set a great number of the monuments from which we make our boundary decisions today.  Suggesting that a bar lacking a cap or tag is somehow automatically worthless is futile.  There was professional level work being done prior to the creation of licensure opportunity or the numerous requirements that have been added since that date.

History of Licensing

Licensing has been in existence in the State of Kansas since the Registration Board for Professional Engineers with its first meeting in July of 1931.  It was comprised of five individuals, including the Deans of Engineering at Kansas State University and University of Kansas, a County Engineer, a Consulting Engineer and an Engineer with a structural steel fabrication company.  All were appointed by then Governor Harry Woodring on July 2, 1931.  Professional Engineer license #1 was issued to R. J. Paulette.

 

The Architectural Registration Board held its first meeting in June 1949, after two years of legislative debate before final approval of statutes allowed the creation of the Board.  The Board was comprised of five individuals who were in private practice; however, the first temporary Chairman was Charles Marshall, who was the State Architect.  Architect License #1 was issued to Charles W. Shaver.

 

The Board for Landscape Architects was established in 1968 and our records for its initial start are not available.  It is known that Ralph Ricklefs of Salina was Chairman of the Board and instrumental in getting the Board established.  Landscape Architect license #1 was issued to Robert P. Ealy on July 21, 1968.

 

The Land Surveyors were incorporated into the Engineer’s Board and information about a separate board is not available at the Board office.  The first Land Surveyor license was issued to Truman Schlup on January 1, 1969.

 

On January 29, 1999, the first Geology License was issued to Lee Gerhard. 

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Posted : September 14, 2021 11:37 am
Chuck Beresford
(@chuck-beresford)
100+ posts Supporter

Re "looking up"- A decade or so ago, when I was working for a local firm that did a lot of work for Xcel Energy, we were requested to meet one of their Landmen on site to mark a potential route for an electric transmission line near Leadville Colorado in early spring (probably late March or early April of a year that had a lot of spring snow). We met with the Landman (Al Morganfield PLS, who some of you on here knew) and spent a great day walking through the high country in snow shoes with Al putting flagging on trees to mark the potential route, and talking land surveying, mining claims and whatnot. Later that year, Al called to give us the go ahead to start surveying the route, so we get a calc package together for the field crew, and off the 3 of them go into the high country. Later in the day the Party Chief calls, and he's scratching he's head since he cannot find any of the flagging in the trees. I checked his Lat/Long and knew he should be close, so my only response was "look up"- sure enough the Leadville area had about 20+ feet of snow that spring, and way up in the trees was the flagging... love surveying in Colorado.

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Posted : September 14, 2021 12:44 pm

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